How Can Your Kids Get Rid of Fever Blisters?

If your child has started to develop sores on his or her lips or inside of the mouth, they could be cold sores or fever blisters. Below we’ll discuss causes of cold sores and how to get rid of them.

What Is a Fever Blister?

When your child has a fever blister, sometimes called a cold sore, it will appear as a reddish bump—usually in clusters—inside your child’s mouth or around the lips.

The most common place for you to see these fever blisters is around the border of your child’s lip.

How Can My Child Get Rid of Fever Blisters?

Cold sores and fever blisters are caused by a virus, called the Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1, or HSV1. Because it’s a virus, there are no medicines that a doctor or dentist can give you that will kill it.

However, there are a few medications that can help the sores heal faster.

Your child’s dentist can help explain the virus, what causes the cold sores and fever blisters to pop up, and how to stop them. Once your child has a blister or a sore, the dentist will advise you to take these steps:

  • Keep the area around the sore and around the lips moisturized with lip balm.
  • Try not to touch the area.
  • Don’t pick at the sore or blister.
  • Don’t share food or drink when there is a sore.

Should I Call a Dentist?

Although the first outbreak of cold sores will usually happen within a few days of being exposed to the virus, these will usually go away. The virus will only cause more cold sores and fever blisters later in life, usually in times of stress or during times of sickness. 

You should call a doctor if your child has any of these symptoms:

  • Sores that last longer than a week
  • Fever
  • Sores that make talking and swallowing difficult or painful

Call Kool Smiles Today

If your child has fever blisters and needs to see the dentist, bring him or her to Kool Smiles. We’re a network of general and pediatric dentists and we’re always accepting new patients.

Give us a call today to make an appointment with one of our experienced dentists.

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Sources:

Colgate: http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/conditions/mouth-sores-and-infections/article/cold-sores-and-fever-blisters

WebMD: http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/tc/cold-sores-topic-overview